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Key Liberal and Labor policy differences to know before you vote


Polling in the lead up to the 2022 Federal Election have consistently shown there are thousands of undecided voters across the country.

Policies are a clear way to differentiate what each of the major parties are standing for, with each having differing plans across some topics such as the economy, climate change, and security.

Here are some of the main differences in policy between the two major parties on key election issues.

The Great Australian Dream

When it comes to people fulfilling the Aussie dream of buying a home, Labor is promising to help first time buyers into the market by paying for a stake in the property of up to 40 per cent.

Voters walk into a pre-polling booth in Sydney, Australia, Friday, May 20, 2022.
Polling in the lead up to the 2022 Federal Election have consistently shown there are thousands of undecided voters across the country. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

The Liberal Party says it will allow first home buyers to draw on their superannuation for a deposit and extend tax breaks for boomers — people born roughly between 1946 and 1945 — who downsize their home.

Both the Labor and Liberal parties are aiming for net zero emissions by 2050.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s pathway of getting there depends on carbon capture and storage, which is the process of seizing carbon dioxide prior to it entering the atmosphere, moving it and keeping it for hundreds of years. The Morrison government is also looking at using hydrogen as a transition fuel.

Labor leader Anthony Albanese’s government would aim to upgrade the electricity grid to facilitate renewable energy use.

With the rising cost of living a major challenge for Australian households, coupled with the recent revelation that wages have grown at less than half the rate of inflation, reduced childcare costs has been presented as one of the ways to help families cope.

Policies are a clear way to differentiate what each of the major parties are standing for, with each having differing plans across some topics such as the economy, climate change, and security (Supplied)

Labor is pledging to subsidise 90 per cent of the cost for all families.

Meanwhile, if re-elected, the Coalition will pay for 85 per cent of costs for those with one child in care and 95 per cent for families with two or more.

In the wake of the aged care crisis during the COVID-19 pandemic, where the latest government figures indicate that 1418 people in aged care facilities had died with the virus, policies on the area have been key.

The Morrison government has previously budgeted for an increase in hands-on nursing hours and additional home care packages.

Queensland aged care nurses stranded in NSW after leaving families to assist with COVID crisis
In the wake of the aged care crisis during the COVID-19 pandemic, where the latest government figures indicate that 1418 people in aged care facilities had died with the virus, policies on the area have been key (9News)

Labor’s approach would see a registered nurse on duty around the clock at aged care facilities and a significant pay rise of up to 25 per cent for staff.

According to a poll by the Australia Institute, three in four Australians surveyed said integrity issues were more important during this election than they were in the 2019 Federal Election.

Labor says if elected it will establish a national anti-corruption commission that would have powers to publicly cross-examine politicians.

The strangest moments of the 2022 federal election campaign

The Coalition has failed to establish such a commission, which it promised to do so at the last election. Morrison has said such a body could lead to Australia becoming a “public autocracy” if it was allowed a significant impact on political choices.

With the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the sighting of a Chinese surveillance vessel off the coast of Western Australia on May 13, security has been an issue frequently discussed by both major parties.

Labor says it supports increased spending on national security and would also aim to increase foreign aid.

The Liberals are pouring $270 billion into new military arsenal over the next 10 years.



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